i thought this was the ladies' room
'There's no need for heartbreak warfare. It's called 'I love you' — 'I love you too'. 'I need more love' — 'You got more love', and you can get through life like that. Shouldn't you just on days where you want more love be like 'I had a bad dream that you were sleeping around, it's really irrational, but just love me extra today'. Why can't we just have this thing where you just say 'Just love me extra today'. If I was with somebody and they said 'Love me extra today', I would love them extra forever.'
John Mayer, Atlanta, 2010. (via lookandlisteng)
Patrick Sullivan - Pacific Rim
21,617 plays

bigbigtruck:

ktjayne:

martin-van-gurren:

sly-dat-magical-unicorn:

paulsgroovypalace:

amagi-challenge:

redtroubadour:

WOULD YOU RATHER DIE HERE

OR IN AD 1999

hell yes

OH MY GOD

Chrono Trigger soundfont is best soundfont

Chrono Trigger soundfont is my life

yaaaaaaaaas

this pleases me quite a lot

superziggy:

So we’re listening to music and up next was a LOTR play along midi file for my clarinet students…

heysawbones:

alliartist:

music-holic:

And the Waltz Goes On - Anthony Hopkins 

Sir Anthony Hopkins Hears The Waltz He Wrote 50 Years Ago For The First Time

Academy Award-winning actor Sir Anthony Hopkins was a musician before he got into acting. 50 years ago he wrote a waltz but was too afraid to ever hear it play. Dutch violinist André Rieu performs it for the very first time. Watch Hopkins’ reaction.

That was beautiful

I cried a few tears and felt better about humanity’s endeavors.

mellowmodesty:

wow this is fucking historic as fuck i can’t believe im seeing this

59 plays

jindywahr:

His comrades fought beside him, Van Owen and the rest
But of all the Thompson gunners, Roland was the best
So the CIA decided they wanted Roland dead
That son of a bitch Van Owen blew off Roland’s head

Michael Jackson - Beat It (Demo)
1,555,867 plays

blue-author:

lacienegasmiled:

Demo of Beat It composed using only Michael Jackson’s voice

As Jackson couldn’t fluently play any instruments, he would sing and beatbox out how he wanted his songs to sound by himself on tape, layering the vocals, harmonies and rhythm before having instrumentalists come in to complete the songs.

One of his engineers Robmix on how Jackson worked: “One morning MJ came in with a new song he had written overnight. We called in a guitar player, and Michael sang every note of every chord to him. “here’s the first chord first note, second note, third note. Here’s the second chord first note, second note, third note”, etc., etc. We then witnessed him giving the most heartfelt and profound vocal performance, live in the control room through an SM57. He would sing us an entire string arrangement, every part. Steve Porcaro once told me he witnessed MJ doing that with the string section in the room. Had it all in his head, harmony and everything. Not just little eight bar loop ideas. he would actually sing the entire arrangement into a micro-cassette recorder complete with stops and fills.”

Reasons why I laugh when people say he wasn’t a real musician.

Chills.

Though we may not all survive here
There are things that never die
What’s the difference, die a schoolboy,
Die a policeman, die a spy?

After finding it, this is my favourite line from Les Miserables and I’m rather upset that it’s been cut from almost all versions.

Combeferre says the first two lines, Grantaire the latter two, and it occurs directly after Gavroche reveals Javert’s identity as a spy.  I think that it characterizes both men so beautifully.  The idealism and the cynicism play off each other in such stark contrast and it really does a great job of outlining two vastly different ways of considering the situation that the students are in.

(via canadiancosette)

breanna-lynn:

"I’ve written a song for my wife."

Fred was married 72 years to his wife. He wrote a song for her when he saw a songwriting contest advertised in the paper, and he couldn’t resist writing one for her. She had just passed a month earlier.
They had been together since the 30′s.
96 years old, Fred couldn’t play an instrument or sing, so he simply mailed in his lyrics, attaching his story in the letter. When the studio holding the contest saw his song and read his letter, they decided to record it for him and play the song for him to hear.

Grab some tissues before you watch this.